In 1948, Ferdinand Porsche crafted a vehicle that would change the automotive world forever. The Porsche 356, the grandfather of the 911 model, was Porsche’s first production vehicle. Today, there are less than 30,000 left, meaning they’ve amassed some serious value amongst collectors.

But what is an Outlaw?

We will start by talking about the man in the picture. Famous painter and customizer Dean Jeffreys is known to be the first to customize a Porsche 356 in 1957. Just imagine the answer of many of the hard core Porsche connoisseurs after this alleged “sacrilege”!

Jeffreys himself, years after, when asked about why he modified the german wonder, he answererd:

“Because, back then only the sports car guys had any money. All of the hot rodders were broke.”

But it wasn’t until later in the early 80s in California, that the term Outlaw was born, and was first used to define the adventures of  a “Perverted Porsche Collector”. Mr Emory realized one day  that  “we were so busy toothbrushing ’em that we were afraid to drive them anywhere” and decided to bring back to the road many 356 units, not good enough for a full concourse restoration, always with the idea of fun in his mind. Giving them more juice and individual attitude.

“The term 356 Outlaw was a name given to The Emory’s in the early 80’s because we were not afraid to install race and rally inspired accessories to a vintage Porsche. At time when full concourse restorations were at their peak and the owners were using q-tips to clean the dust out of the defrost vents, we were putting wide wheels and race numbers on our 356’s and driving them the way Porsche intended them to be driven. Now even the Porsche parade concourse events have classes for Outlaws. Emory Motorsports continues to build 356 outlaws for clients all over the world.” Gary Emory.

Then it was youngsters and rebels that fuel the “Outlaw” movement, a crusade against the purist ideology. Fearless Porsche owners took their tools to their cars to convert them in to track cars and street racers alike. Modern engines, updated suspensions, bright paints, no fenders… in fact anything that pushed away from the “concours di elegance” mentality was fair game. It was the start of the “cars are meant to be driven, not parked” mindset.
So its been long since Jeffreys Carrera in 1957, but the creative irreverence once scandalous is now more alive than ever. If you have the time please watch the beautiful film, below! called URBAN OUTLAW,  a portrait of Magnus Walker, the rebel Porsche customizer who turned a hobby into an obsession, and an obsession into a successful business. From a workshop in downtown Los Angeles, Magnus obsessively harvests fragments from donor 911s, grafting them onto vintage frames to create one-off automobiles with the spirit of Ferdinand Porsche but an ethos entirely his own.
[tentblogger-vimeo 44410797]
Bibliography & Images:
Emory Motorsports
The Samba
Steven Denfeld
Parts Obsolete
Autobahn
Stance Works
Type 2 Detectives
Magnus Walker

4 thoughts on “THE OUTLAWS”

  1. O’ WOW, great cars, 277 is a favorite good use of type and color, awesome sound. Great film, thanks for sharing

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